Welcome to
"Millions of people living with pain use some type of medication, often in combination with other treatment modalities to manage their pain. We believe it is important to be as educated as possible about these medications so we can make informed decisions about our pain care."
-Paul Gileno, President, U.S. Pain Foundation

Education

You should know there are 5 schedules of medication
Schedule I

Schedule I are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. They are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence. Some examples are: heroin, LSD, marijuana and ecstasy

SCHEDULE II

Schedule II are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, but less abuse potential than Schedule I. These drugs are also considered dangerous and have the potential to lead to severe psychological or physical dependence. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are: Vicodin, cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine, oxycodone and fentanyl

SCHEDULE III

Schedule III substances are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are: Tylenol with codeine, ketamine, anabolic steroids and testosterone

SCHEDULE IV

Schedule IV drugs are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are: Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Ambien and Tramadol

SCHEDULE V

Schedule V drugs have the lowest potential for abuse and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive and analgesic purposes.

About Us

Knowing Your Medicines Is Very Important

Pain Medicine 411 is one of U.S. Pain Foundation’s programs. By providing current, comprehensive, non-biased information about all types of medications intended for pain relief, both prescription and over-the-counter, people with pain and their caregivers can work with healthcare providers to make educated decisions about the use of these medicines in their care plans.

Pain Medicine 411 strives to help readers understand the benefits as well as the dangers of pain relief medications and become thoroughly educated on the best safe-use practices.

  • 259 million prescriptions for painkillers

    Healthcare providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for painkillers in 2012, enough for every American adult to have bottle of pills. –www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

  • Every day, 46 Americans die

    Every day, 46 Americans die from prescription opioid overdoses, and more than 80% of those deaths are unintentional.

  • overdoses is an epidemic

    If 16,000 people a year dying from overdoses is an epidemic, then 100 million people with chronic pain must be a pandemic.

Pain Medicine 411 proudly supports the 4 Core Beliefs from the National Pain Strategy.


The four core messages are:

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